"Ice Girls," "Pink Jerseys," and "Inebriated Men": Hegemonic Masculinity and the Imagined Communities of Sports Fandom.. Canadian Sociological Association Conference, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities. May 30, 2017

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In this presentation, I argue, building on the theory of Benedict Anderson, that fans of sports teams form imagined communities. While these communities offer meaning and purpose in the context of the alienation and isolation of late capitalism, they also function as spaces that reproduce the logic of hegemonic masculinity. Through a reading of popular culture fan texts and an analysis of qualitative interview testimony from two women-identifying fans of hockey, I argue that sports fandom follows a patriarchal logic. The imagined community of sports fandom is designed for men who identify with conventional and constraining notions of gender and sexuality. If women are to participate, they must align themselves with the same gender logic – indeed, they must participate in their own objectification – or they will be made to feel uncomfortable and unwelcome. Ultimately, fan cultures work alongside the locker room culture of high performance sport to reproduce hegemonic masculinity and emphasized femininity.

Service Performed By

Date

  • May 30, 2017

Service or Event Name

  • Canadian Sociological Association Conference, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities

Location or Venue

  • Ryerson University