Revisiting the Hispanic health paradox: the relative contributions of nativity, country of origin, and race/ethnicity to childhood asthma.

Published

Journal Article

This study examined the relationship between race and Hispanic ethnicity, maternal and child nativity, country of origin and asthma among 2,558 non-Hispanic white and Hispanic children across 65 Los Angeles neighborhoods. A series of two-level multilevel models were estimated to examine the independent effects of race, ethnicity, and country of origin on childhood asthma. Lifetime asthma prevalence was reported among 9% of children, with no significant differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites overall. However, in fully adjusted models, Hispanic children of non-Mexican origin reported higher odds of asthma compared to non-Hispanic white children. A protective nativity effect was also observed among children of foreign born mothers compared to US born mothers. Our study provides evidence in support of the heterogeneity of childhood asthma by Hispanic ethnicity and maternal nativity. These findings suggest moving beyond solely considering racial/ethnic classifications which could mask subgroups at increased risk of childhood asthma.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Camacho-Rivera, M; Kawachi, I; Bennett, GG; Subramanian, SV

Published Date

  • June 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 17 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 826 - 833

PubMed ID

  • 24380929

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24380929

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1557-1920

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1557-1912

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s10903-013-9974-6

Language

  • eng