The behavioral economics of drunk driving.

Published

Journal Article

This study investigates whether drinker-drivers attributes are associated with imperfect rationality or irrationality. Using data from eight U.S. cities, we determine whether drinker-drivers differ from other drinkers in cognitive ability, ignorance of driving while intoxicated (DWI) laws, have higher rates of time preference, are time inconsistent, and lack self-control on other measures. We find that drinker-drivers are relatively knowledgeable about DWI laws and do not differ on two of three study measures of cognitive ability from other drinkers. Drinker-drivers are less prone to plan events involving drinking, e.g., selecting a designated driver in advance of drinking, and are more impulsive. Furthermore, we find evidence in support of hyperbolic discounting. In particular, relative to non-drinker-drivers, the difference between short- and long-term discount rates is much higher for drinker-drivers than for other drinkers. Implications of our findings for public policy, including incapacitation, treatment, and educational interventions, are discussed.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Sloan, FA; Eldred, LM; Xu, Y

Published Date

  • May 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 35 /

Start / End Page

  • 64 - 81

PubMed ID

  • 24603444

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24603444

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-1646

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0167-6296

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2014.01.005

Language

  • eng