Small ubiquitin-like modifier 3-modified proteome regulated by brain ischemia in novel small ubiquitin-like modifier transgenic mice: Putative protective proteins/pathways

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation is a post-translational modification associated with many human diseases. Characterization of the SUMO-modified proteome is pivotal to define the mechanistic link between SUMO conjugation and such diseases. This is particularly evident for SUMO2/3 conjugation, which is massively activated after brain ischemia/stroke, and is believed to be a protective response. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of the SUMO3-modified proteome regulated by brain ischemia using a novel SUMO transgenic mouse. METHODS - : To enable SUMO proteomics analysis in vivo, we generated transgenic mice conditionally expressing tagged SUMO1-3 paralogues. Transgenic mice were subjected to 10 minutes forebrain ischemia and 1 hour of reperfusion. SUMO3-conjugated proteins were enriched by anti-FLAG affinity purification and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS - : Characterization of SUMO transgenic mice demonstrated that all 3 tagged SUMO paralogues were functionally active, and expression of exogenous SUMOs did not modify the endogenous SUMOylation machinery. Proteomics analysis identified 112 putative SUMO3 substrates of which 91 candidates were more abundant in the ischemia group than the sham group. Data analysis revealed processes/pathways with putative neuroprotective functions, including glucocorticoid receptor signaling, RNA processing, and SUMOylation-dependent ubiquitin conjugation. CONCLUSIONS - : The identified proteins/pathways modulated by SUMOylation could be the key to understand the mechanisms linking SUMOylation to neuroprotection, and thus provide new promising targets for therapeutic interventions. The new transgenic mouse will be an invaluable platform for analyzing the SUMO-modified proteome in models of human disorders and thereby help to mechanistically link SUMOylation to the pathological processes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Yang, W; Sheng, H; Thompson, JW; Zhao, S; Wang, L; Miao, P; Liu, X; Moseley, MA; Paschen, W

Published Date

  • January 1, 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 45 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 1115 - 1122

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1524-4628

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0039-2499

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.004315

Citation Source

  • Scopus