Use of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values for Diagnosis of Pediatric Posterior Fossa Tumors.

Journal Article

We prospectively compared the ability of neuroradiologists to diagnose medulloblastoma with novice raters using only apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured on ADC maps. One hundred and three pediatric patients with pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging scans showing a posterior fossa tumor with histological verification were retrospectively identified from a ten-year period at a tertiary care medical center. A single observer measured the lowest ADC values in all tumors to determine the mean minimum ADC (ADCmin) value that provided greatest accuracy in distinguishing medulloblastomas from other tumors, which was determined to be 0.66×10(-3) mm(2)/s. Imaging studies, including ADC maps, from 90 patients were provided to two neuroradiologists, who provided a diagnosis, which was later dichotomized as medulloblastoma or other. Two medical students measured ADCmin within tumors and those with ADCmin < 0.66×10(-3) mm(2)/s were recorded as medulloblastoma; any other value was recorded as other. Diagnostic accuracy was measured. ADCmin values allowed a correct identification of lesions as either medulloblastoma or other in 91% of cases. After diagnoses by the two neuroradiologists were categorized as either medulloblastoma or other, their diagnoses were correct in 90% and 84% of cases, respectively. In 19 cases, at least one neuroradiologist was incorrect; the addition of ADC values to clinical interpretation would have allowed a correct diagnosis in 63% of such cases. Diagnostic accuracy based on ADC values by medical students was comparable to that of subspecialty-trained neuroradiologists. Our findings suggest that the addition of ADC values to standard film interpretation may improve the diagnostic rate for these tumors.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Pierce, T; Kranz, PG; Roth, C; Leong, D; Wei, P; Provenzale, JM

Published Date

  • April 18, 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 27 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 233 - 244

PubMed ID

  • 24750714

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24750714

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2385-1996

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1971-4009

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.15274/nrj-2014-10027

Language

  • eng