Twenty years of workers' compensation costs due to falls from height among union carpenters, Washington state.

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Falls from height (FFH) are a longstanding, serious problem in construction. METHODS: We report workers' compensation (WC) payments associated with FFH among a cohort (n = 24,830; 1989-2008) of carpenters. Mean/median payments, cost rates, and adjusted rate ratios based on hours worked were calculated using negative-binomial regression. RESULTS: Over the 20-year period FFH accounted for $66.6 million in WC payments or $700 per year for each full-time equivalent (2,000 hr of work). FFH were responsible for 5.5% of injuries but 15.1% of costs. Cost declines were observed, but not monotonically. Reductions were more pronounced for indemnity than medical care. Mean costs were 2.3 times greater among carpenters over 50 than those under 30; cost rates were only modestly higher. CONCLUSIONS: Significant progress has been made in reducing WC payments associated with FFH in this cohort particularly through 1996; primary gains reflect reduction in frequency of falls. FFH that occur remain costly.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lipscomb, HJ; Schoenfisch, AL; Cameron, W; Kucera, KL; Adams, D; Silverstein, BA

Published Date

  • September 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 57 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 984 - 991

PubMed ID

  • 24771631

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-0274

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0271-3586

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/ajim.22339

Language

  • eng