Proteomic differences between male and female anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon.

The risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and re-injury is greater for women than men. Among other factors, compositional differences may play a role in this differential risk. Patellar tendon (PT) autografts are commonly used during reconstruction. The aim of the study was to compare protein expression in male and female ACL and PT. We hypothesized that there would be differences in key structural components between PT and ACL, and that components of the proteome critical for response to mechanical loading and response to injury would demonstrate significant differences between male and female. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and a label-free quantitative approach was used to identify proteomic differences between male and female PT and ACL. ACL contained less type I and more type III collagen than PT. There were tissue-specific differences in expression of proteoglycans, and ACL was enriched in elastin, tenascin C and X, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, thrombospondin 4 and periostin. Between male and female donors, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B and complement component 9 were enriched in female compared to male. Myocilin was the major protein enriched in males compared to females. Important compositional differences between PT and ACL were identified, and we identified differences in pathways related to extracellular matrix regulation, complement, apoptosis, metabolism of advanced glycation end-products and response to mechanical loading between males and females. Identification of proteomic differences between male and female PT and ACL has identified novel pathways which may lead to improved understanding of differential ACL injury and re-injury risk between males and females.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Little, D; Thompson, JW; Dubois, LG; Ruch, DS; Moseley, MA; Guilak, F

Published Date

  • 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 9 / 5

Start / End Page

  • e96526 -

PubMed ID

  • 24818782

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1932-6203

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pone.0096526

Language

  • eng