Substance use disorders and co-morbidities among Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

BACKGROUND: Asian Americans (AAs) and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (NHs/PIs) are the fastest growing segments of the US population. However, their population sizes are small, and thus AAs and NHs/PIs are often aggregated into a single racial/ethnic group or omitted from research and health statistics. The groups' substance use disorders (SUDs) and treatment needs have been under-recognized. METHOD: We examined recent epidemiological data on the extent of alcohol and drug use disorders and the use of treatment services by AAs and NHs/PIs. RESULTS: NHs/PIs on average were less educated and had lower levels of household income than AAs. Considered as a single group, AAs and NHs/PIs showed a low prevalence of substance use and disorders. Analyses of survey data that compared AAs and NHs/PIs revealed higher prevalences of substance use (alcohol, drugs), depression and delinquency among NHs than among AAs. Among treatment-seeking patients in mental healthcare settings, NHs/PIs had higher prevalences of DSM-IV diagnoses than AAs (alcohol/drug, mood, adjustment, childhood-onset disruptive or impulse-control disorders), although co-morbidity was common in both groups. AAs and NHs/PIs with an SUD were unlikely to use treatment, especially treatment for alcohol problems, and treatment use tended to be related to involvement with the criminal justice system. CONCLUSIONS: Although available data are limited by small sample sizes of AAs and NHs/PIs, they demonstrate the need to separate AAs and NHs/PIs in health statistics and increase research into substance use and treatment needs for these fast-growing but understudied population groups.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wu, L-T; Blazer, DG

Published Date

  • February 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 45 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 481 - 494

PubMed ID

  • 25066115

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25066115

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1469-8978

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1017/S0033291714001330

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England