Intrastriatal injection of autologous blood or clostridial collagenase as murine models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

Journal Article

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common form of cerebrovascular disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Lack of effective treatment and failure of large clinical trials aimed at hemostasis and clot removal demonstrate the need for further mechanism-driven investigation of ICH. This research may be performed through the framework provided by preclinical models. Two murine models in popular use include intrastriatal (basal ganglia) injection of either autologous whole blood or clostridial collagenase. Since, each model represents distinctly different pathophysiological features related to ICH, use of a particular model may be selected based on what aspect of the disease is to be studied. For example, autologous blood injection most accurately represents the brain's response to the presence of intraparenchymal blood, and may most closely replicate lobar hemorrhage. Clostridial collagenase injection most accurately represents the small vessel rupture and hematoma evolution characteristic of deep hemorrhages. Thus, each model results in different hematoma formation, neuroinflammatory response, cerebral edema development, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Robustness of a purported therapeutic intervention can be best assessed using both models. In this protocol, induction of ICH using both models, immediate post-operative demonstration of injury, and early post-operative care techniques are demonstrated. Both models result in reproducible injuries, hematoma volumes, and neurobehavioral deficits. Because of the heterogeneity of human ICH, multiple preclinical models are needed to thoroughly explore pathophysiologic mechanisms and test potential therapeutic strategies.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lei, B; Sheng, H; Wang, H; Lascola, CD; Warner, DS; Laskowitz, DT; James, ML

Published Date

  • January 2014

Published In

PubMed ID

  • 25046028

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1940-087X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1940-087X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3791/51439

Language

  • eng