The NF1 gene revisited - from bench to bedside.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a relatively common tumour predisposition syndrome related to germline aberrations of NF1, a tumour suppressor gene. The gene product neurofibromin is a negative regulator of the Ras cellular proliferation pathway, and also exerts tumour suppression via other mechanisms. Recent next-generation sequencing projects have revealed somatic NF1 aberrations in various sporadic tumours. NF1 plays a critical role in a wide range of tumours. NF1 alterations appear to be associated with resistance to therapy and adverse outcomes in several tumour types. Identification of a patient's germline or somatic NF1 aberrations can be challenging, as NF1 is one of the largest human genes, with a myriad of possible mutations. Epigenetic factors may also also contribute to inadequate levels of neurofibromin in cancer cells. Clinical trials of NF1-based therapeutic approaches are currently limited. Preclinical studies on neurofibromin-deficient malignancies have mainly been on malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour cell lines or xenografts derived from NF1 patients. However, the emerging recognition of the role of NF1 in sporadic cancers may lead to the development of NF1-based treatments for other tumour types. Improved understanding of the implications of NF1 aberrations is critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Yap, Y-S; McPherson, JR; Ong, C-K; Rozen, SG; Teh, B-T; Lee, ASG; Callen, DF

Published Date

  • August 15, 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 5 / 15

Start / End Page

  • 5873 - 5892

PubMed ID

  • 25026295

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25026295

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1949-2553

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.18632/oncotarget.2194

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States