Improved arterial blood oxygenation following intravenous infusion of cold supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution.

Published

Journal Article

One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model.Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer's lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control.Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state.A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Grady, DJ; Gentile, MA; Riggs, JH; Cheifetz, IM

Published Date

  • January 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 8 /

Start / End Page

  • 11 - 16

PubMed ID

  • 25249764

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25249764

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1179-5484

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1179-5484

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.4137/CCRPM.S16760

Language

  • eng