The effects of 2 landing techniques on knee kinematics, kinetics, and performance during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks.

Published

Journal Article

Anterior cruciate ligament injuries (ACL) commonly occur during jump landing and cutting tasks. Attempts to land softly and land with greater knee flexion are associated with decreased ACL loading. However, their effects on performance are unclear.Attempts to land softly will decrease peak posterior ground-reaction force (PPGRF) and knee extension moment at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact will increase knee flexion at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during both tasks. In addition, both landing techniques will increase stance time and lower extremity mechanical work as well as decrease jump height and movement speed compared with a natural landing during both tasks.Controlled laboratory study.A total of 18 male and 18 female recreational athletes participated in the study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks under 3 conditions: natural landing, soft landing, and landing with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact.Attempts to land softly decreased PPGRF and knee extension moment at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during stop-jump tasks. Attempts to land softly decreased PPGRF compared with a natural landing during side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact increased knee flexion angle at PPGRF compared with a natural landing during both stop-jump and side-cutting tasks. Attempts to land softly and land with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact increased stance time and lower extremity mechanical work, as well as decreased jump height and movement speed during both stop-jump and side-cutting tasks.Although landing softly and landing with greater knee flexion at initial ground contact may reduce ACL loading during stop-jump and side-cutting tasks, the performance of these tasks decreased, as indicated by increased stance time and mechanical work as well as decreased jump height and movement speed.Training effects tested in laboratory environments with the focus on reducing ACL loading may be reduced in actual competition environments when the focus is on athlete performance. The effects of training programs for ACL injury prevention on lower extremity biomechanics in athletic tasks may need to be evaluated in laboratories as well as in actual competitions.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Dai, B; Garrett, WE; Gross, MT; Padua, DA; Queen, RM; Yu, B

Published Date

  • February 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 43 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 466 - 474

PubMed ID

  • 25367015

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25367015

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1552-3365

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0363-5465

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0363546514555322

Language

  • eng