Ophthalmologist-patient communication, self-efficacy, and glaucoma medication adherence.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations of provider-patient communication, glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy, and outcome expectations with glaucoma medication adherence. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-nine patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or taking glaucoma medications were recruited at 6 ophthalmology clinics. METHODS: Patients' visits were video recorded and communication variables were coded using a detailed coding tool developed by the authors. Adherence was measured using Medication Event Monitoring Systems for 60 days after their visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The following adherence variables were measured for the 60-day period after their visits: whether the patient took 80% or more of the prescribed doses, percentage of the correct number of prescribed doses taken each day, and percentage of the prescribed doses taken on time. RESULTS: Higher glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy was associated positively with better adherence with all 3 measures. Black race was associated negatively with percentage of the correct number of doses taken each day (β = -0.16; P < 0.05) and whether the patient took 80% or more of the prescribed doses (odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.86). Physician education about how to administer drops was associated positively with percentage of the correct number of doses taken each day (β = 0.18; P < 0.01) and percentage of the prescribed doses taken on time (β = 0.15; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that provider education about how to administer glaucoma drops and patient glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy are associated positively with adherence.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Sleath, B; Blalock, SJ; Carpenter, DM; Sayner, R; Muir, KW; Slota, C; Lawrence, SD; Giangiacomo, AL; Hartnett, ME; Tudor, G; Goldsmith, JA; Robin, AL

Published Date

  • April 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 122 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 748 - 754

PubMed ID

  • 25542521

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25542521

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1549-4713

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.ophtha.2014.11.001

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States