Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

Published

Journal Article

Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs) and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs). To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR)-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS), ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS) and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE) repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7) and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110) relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving) and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53RE context in the induced transactivation response. This p53 regulated response appears to have been tuned via evolutionary processes that may have led to repression and/or utilization of p53REs originating from primate-specific transposon elements.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Su, D; Wang, X; Campbell, MR; Song, L; Safi, A; Crawford, GE; Bell, DA

Published Date

  • January 8, 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 11 / 1

Start / End Page

  • e1004885 -

PubMed ID

  • 25569532

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25569532

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1553-7404

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1553-7390

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004885

Language

  • eng