Graft survival in a rhesus renal transplant model after immunotoxin-mediated T-cell depletion is enhanced by mycophenolate and steroids.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Anti-CD3 immunotoxin (IT), a T-cell-depleting agent, prolongs survival of renal allografts in a rhesus monkey model without the need for long-term immunosuppression. In this study we sought to further prolong allograft survival by giving short-term conventional immunosuppression simultaneous with IT administration. METHODS: MHC class II mismatched, juvenile rhesus monkeys were paired as donor and recipient for renal transplantation. Recipients received two to three daily doses of IT starting on the day of transplantation. Additional immunosuppression was given for no more than 60 days. Graft function was monitored by serum creatinine and renal biopsies. Flow cytometry was used to monitor T-cell recovery. RESULTS: Graft survival time (GST) in animals receiving IT was prolonged compared with controls with 50% of IT-treated monkeys surviving >100 days. Animals treated with IT plus mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and steroids had significantly enhanced GST (mean GST, 305 days) compared with those treated with IT alone (mean GST, 94 days). In contrast, addition of cyclosporine or 40-O-[2-Hydroxyethyl]rapamycin did not significantly increase graft survival time. A comparison among animals from all treatment groups with short (<100 days) and long (>100 days) GST demonstrated that those with the shorter GST had a higher blood T-cell count 2 weeks after transplantation. Full recovery of CD4+ T cells required longer than 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: A combination with MMF and steroids given for 4 days after renal allograft transplantation significantly increases GST in IT-treated monkeys. We hypothesize that MMF and steroids suppress the initial T-cell activation mediated by IT.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Fechner, JH; Dong, Y; Hong, X; Brunner, KG; Tsuchida, M; Neville, D; Scharff, J; Lee, F; Oberley, TD; Peters, D; Schultz, JM; Manthei, ER; Hamawy, MM; Knechtle, SJ

Published Date

  • August 27, 2001

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 72 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 581 - 587

PubMed ID

  • 11544415

Pubmed Central ID

  • 11544415

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0041-1337

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/00007890-200108270-00005

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States