Outcomes in kidney transplant recipients from older living donors.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Previous studies demonstrate that graft survival from older living kidney donors (LD; age>60 years) is worse than younger LD but similar to deceased standard criteria donors (SCD). Limited sample size has precluded more detailed analyses of transplants from older LD. METHODS: Using the United Network for Organ Sharing database from 1994 to 2012, recipients were categorized by donor status: SCD, expanded criteria donor (ECD), or LD (by donor age: <60, 60-64, 65-69, ≥70 years). Adjusted models, controlling for donor and recipient risk factors, evaluated graft and recipient survivals. RESULTS: Of 250,827 kidney transplants during the study period, 92,646 were LD kidneys, with 4.5% of these recipients (n=4,186) transplanted with older LD kidneys. The use of LD donors 60 years or older increased significantly from 3.6% in 1994 to 7.4% in 2011. Transplant recipients with older LD kidneys had significantly lower graft and overall survival compared to younger LD recipients. Compared to SCD recipients, graft survival was decreased in recipients with LD 70 years or older, but overall survival was similar. Older LD kidney recipients had better graft and overall survival than ECD recipients. CONCLUSIONS: As use of older kidney donors increases, overall survival among kidney transplant recipients from older living donors was similar to or better than SCD recipients, better than ECD recipients, but worse than younger LD recipients. With increasing kidney donation from older adults to alleviate profound organ shortages, the use of older kidney donors appears to be an equivalent or beneficial alternative to awaiting deceased donor kidneys.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Englum, BR; Schechter, MA; Irish, WD; Ravindra, KV; Vikraman, DS; Sanoff, SL; Ellis, MJ; Sudan, DL; Patel, UD

Published Date

  • February 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 99 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 309 - 315

PubMed ID

  • 25594554

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25594554

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1534-6080

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/TP.0000000000000607

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States