Factors associated with a lack of pap smear utilization in women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol.

Published

Journal Article

Women in the 1940s-1960s were prescribed diethylstilbestrol (DES), a nonsteroidal estrogen, to prevent miscarriages, but the practice was terminated after it was discovered that the daughters so exposed in utero were at increased risk for developing clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCA) of the vagina or cervix at early ages. Pap smear screening is one of the principal methods used to identify tumor development and is necessary in this group of women to maintain their health. Currently, little is known about the factors associated with nonutilization of this screening tool in this high-risk population of women.National cohort data from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) DES Combined Cohort Follow-up Study during 1994, 1997, 2001, and 2006 were used to determine which factors were associated with Pap smear screening nonutilization in 2006 among DES-exposed and unexposed women. Self-reported questionnaire data from 2,861 DES-exposed and 1,027 unexposed women were analyzed using binary logistic regression models.DES exposure, not having a previous gynecologic dysplasia diagnosis, lack of insurance, originating cohort, increasing age, and previous screening behavior were all factors associated with not reporting a Pap smear examination in the 2006 questionnaire, although college education reduced nonutilization.Understanding which factors are associated with not acquiring a screening exam can help clinicians better identify which DES-exposed women are at risk for nonutilization and possibly tailor their standard of care to aid in the early detection of cervical and vaginal adenocarcinomas in this high-risk group.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Camp, EA; Prehn, AW; Shen, J; Herbst, AL; Strohsnitter, WC; Hobday, CD; Robboy, SJ; Adam, E

Published Date

  • April 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 24 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 308 - 315

PubMed ID

  • 25768943

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25768943

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1931-843X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1540-9996

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1089/jwh.2014.4930

Language

  • eng