Ex vivo generation of dendritic cells from cryopreserved, post-induction chemotherapy, mobilized leukapheresis from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma.

Published

Journal Article

Generation of patient-derived, autologous dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical component of cancer immunotherapy with ex vivo-generated, tumor antigen-loaded DCs. An important factor in the ability to generate DCs is the potential impact of prior therapies on DC phenotype and function. We investigated the ability to generate DCs using cells harvested from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma for potential evaluation of DC-RNA based vaccination approach in this patient population. Cells harvested from medulloblastoma patient leukapheresis following induction chemotherapy and granulocyte colony stimulating factor mobilization were cryopreserved prior to use in DC generation. DCs were generated from the adherent CD14+ monocytes using standard procedures and analyzed for cell recovery, phenotype and function. To summarize, 4 out of 5 patients (80%) had sufficient monocyte recovery to permit DC generation, and we were able to generate DCs from 3 out of these 4 patient samples (75%). Overall, we successfully generated DCs that met phenotypic requisites for DC-based cancer therapy from 3 out of 5 (60%) patient samples and met both phenotypic and functional requisites from 2 out of 5 (40%) patient samples. This study highlights the potential to generate functional DCs for further clinical treatments from refractory patients that have been heavily pretreated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate the utility of evaluating the effect of the currently employed standard-of-care therapies on the ex vivo generation of DCs for DC-based clinical studies in cancer patients.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Nair, SK; Driscoll, T; Boczkowski, D; Schmittling, R; Reynolds, R; Johnson, LA; Grant, G; Fuchs, H; Bigner, DD; Sampson, JH; Gururangan, S; Mitchell, DA

Published Date

  • October 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 125 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 65 - 74

PubMed ID

  • 26311248

Pubmed Central ID

  • 26311248

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1573-7373

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0167-594X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s11060-015-1890-2

Language

  • eng