How glaucoma patient characteristics, self-efficacy and patient-provider communication are associated with eye drop technique.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which patient characteristics, eye drop technique self-efficacy, and ophthalmologist-patient communication about eye drop administration are associated with glaucoma patients' ability to instil a single drop, have the drop land in the eye, and avoid touching the applicator tip of the medication bottle to the eye or face while self-administering eye drops. METHODS: Glaucoma patients (n = 279) were recruited from six ophthalmology clinics. Medical visits were videotape-recorded. Afterwards, patients were interviewed and demonstrated administering an eye drop on a videotaped-recording. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. KEY FINDINGS: Ophthalmologists provided eye drop administration instruction to 40 patients. Patients with more years of education were significantly more likely to both instil a single drop (P = 0.017) and have the drop land in their eye (P = 0.017). Women were significantly more likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P = 0.014). Patients with severe glaucoma (P = 0.016), women (P = 0.026), and patients who asked at least one eye drop administration question (P = 0.001) were significantly less likely to instil a single drop. Patients with arthritis were significantly less likely to have the drop land in their eye (P = 0.008). African American patients were significantly less likely to touch the applicator tip to their eyes or face (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Some glaucoma patients have a difficult time self-administering eye drops. As so few patients received eye drop administration instruction from their providers, there is an opportunity for pharmacists to complement care.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Sayner, R; Carpenter, DM; Robin, AL; Blalock, SJ; Muir, KW; Vitko, M; Hartnett, ME; Lawrence, SD; Giangiacomo, AL; Tudor, G; Goldsmith, JA; Sleath, B

Published Date

  • April 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 24 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 78 - 85

PubMed ID

  • 26303667

Pubmed Central ID

  • 26303667

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2042-7174

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/ijpp.12215

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England