Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief.

Journal Article

Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Asarnow, JR; Hoagwood, KE; Stancin, T; Lochman, JE; Hughes, JL; Miranda, JM; Wysocki, T; Portwood, SG; Piacentini, J; Tynan, D; Atkins, M; Kazak, AE

Published Date

  • November 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 44 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 923 - 932

PubMed ID

  • 26430948

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1537-4424

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1537-4416

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/15374416.2015.1077451

Language

  • eng