Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelofibrosis with Prior Exposure to Janus Kinase 1/2 Inhibitors.

Published

Journal Article

The impact of Janus kinase (JAK) 1/2 inhibitor therapy before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has not been studied in a large cohort in myelofibrosis (MF). In this retrospective multicenter study, we analyzed outcomes of patients who underwent HCT for MF with prior exposure to JAK1/2 inhibitors. One hundred consecutive patients from participating centers were analyzed, and based on clinical status and response to JAK1/2 inhibitors at the time of HCT, patients were stratified into 5 groups: (1) clinical improvement (n = 23), (2) stable disease (n = 31), (3) new cytopenia/increasing blasts/intolerance (n = 15), (4) progressive disease: splenomegaly (n = 18), and (5) progressive disease: leukemic transformation (LT) (n = 13). Overall survival (OS) at 2 years was 61% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49% to 71%). OS was 91% (95% CI, 69% to 98%) for those who experienced clinical improvement and 32% (95% CI, 8% to 59%) for those who developed LT on JAK1/2 inhibitors. In multivariable analysis, response to JAK1/2 inhibitors (P = .03), dynamic international prognostic scoring system score (P = .003), and donor type (P = .006) were independent predictors of survival. Among the 66 patients who remained on JAK1/2 inhibitors until stopped for HCT, 2 patients developed serious adverse events necessitating delay of HCT and another 8 patients had symptoms with lesser severity. Adverse events were more common in patients who started tapering or abruptly stopped their regular dose ≥6 days before conditioning therapy. We conclude that prior exposure to JAK1/2 inhibitors did not adversely affect post-transplantation outcomes. Our data suggest that JAK1/2 inhibitors should be continued near to the start of conditioning therapy. The favorable outcomes of patients who experienced clinical improvement with JAK1/2 inhibitor therapy before HCT were particularly encouraging, and need further prospective validation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Shanavas, M; Popat, U; Michaelis, LC; Fauble, V; McLornan, D; Klisovic, R; Mascarenhas, J; Tamari, R; Arcasoy, MO; Davies, J; Gergis, U; Ukaegbu, OC; Kamble, RT; Storring, JM; Majhail, NS; Romee, R; Verstovsek, S; Pagliuca, A; Vasu, S; Ernst, B; Atenafu, EG; Hanif, A; Champlin, R; Hari, P; Gupta, V

Published Date

  • March 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 22 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 432 - 440

PubMed ID

  • 26493563

Pubmed Central ID

  • 26493563

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1523-6536

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.10.005

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States