BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS OF VITREOMACULAR TRACTION PROGRESSING TO FULL-THICKNESS MACULAR OR LAMELLAR HOLES IN THE PHASE III TRIALS OF ENZYMATIC VITREOLYSIS.

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Conference Paper

PURPOSE: To identify characteristics associated with progression from vitreomacular traction (VMT) to a full-thickness macular hole (FTMH) or lamellar hole (LH). METHODS: Post-hoc analysis of the Phase III clinical trial comparing ocriplasmin with placebo for treatment of vitreomacular adhesion (MIVI-TRUST). Exact logistic regression analyses were used to identify baseline characteristics significantly associated with progression from vitreomacular traction to FTMH or LH over the 6-month study period. RESULTS: Twenty eyes (4.5%) developed an FTMH and 38 (9.7%) developed an LH during the study period. The rate of progression to FTMH or LH did not differ significantly between ocriplasmin- and saline-treated eyes (P = 0.090 for FTMH, P = 0.369 for LH). On univariate analysis, the presence of subretinal fluid (adjusted odds ratio 5.64, 95% confidence interval 2.02-17.17, P < 0.001) and mean subretinal fluid thickness (adjusted odds ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.16, P = 0.003) were associated with FTMH development. Both remained significantly associated with FTMH development on multivariate testing. On univariate analysis, the presence of macular schisis (adjusted odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.30-3.82, P = 0.004) and mean retinal thickness (adjusted odds ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.10, P = 0.010) were associated with LH development. Schisis remained a significant predictor of LH formation on multivariate testing. CONCLUSION: Vitreomacular traction is more likely to progress to FTMH when associated with subretinal fluid, but when associated with intraretinal changes (such as schisis), vitreomacular traction appears more likely to progress to a LH after a single intravitreal injection of ocriplasmin or saline.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Schneider, EW; Jaffe, GJ

Published Date

  • August 13, 2019

Published In

PubMed ID

  • 31415451

Pubmed Central ID

  • 31415451

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1539-2864

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002634

Conference Location

  • United States