Gender-specific 30-day outcomes after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: Although the optimal treatment of carotid stenosis remains unclear, available data suggest that women have higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization. We used data from the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry to determine the effect of gender on outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS). METHODS: There were 9865 patients (40.6% women) who underwent CEA (n = 6492) and CAS (n = 3373). The primary end point was a composite of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction at 30 days. RESULTS: There was no difference in age and ethnicity between genders, but men were more likely to be symptomatic (41.6% vs 38.6%; P < .003). There was a higher prevalence of hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in women, whereas men had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease, history of myocardial infarction, and smoking history. For disease etiology in CAS, restenosis was more common in women (28.7% vs 19.7%; P < .0001), and radiation was higher in men (6.2% vs 2.6%; P < .0001). Comparing by gender, there were no statistically significant differences in the primary end point for CEA (women, 4.07%; men, 4.06%) or CAS (women, 6.69%; men, 6.80%). There remains no difference after stratification by symptomatology and multivariate risk adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, real-world analysis, women and men demonstrated similar results after CEA or CAS. These data suggest that, contrary to previous reports, women do not have a higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jim, J; Dillavou, ED; Upchurch, GR; Osborne, NH; Kenwood, CT; Siami, FS; White, RA; Ricotta, JJ; SVS Outcomes Committee,

Published Date

  • March 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 59 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 742 - 748

PubMed ID

  • 24246542

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24246542

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6809

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jvs.2013.09.036

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States