Benefits for Latino, African American, and White children and parents taught together in the same community-based weight management intervention

Published

Journal Article

A secondary data analysis was used to compare 40 Latino (Portugal and Puerto Rico), African American, and White parents and 40 children who received a 12-week nutrition, exercise, and coping skills training weight management intervention. At 6 months, African American, Latino, and White parents showed no significant differences in body mass index (p = .69), body fat percentage (p = .43), pedometer steps (p = .88), nutrition knowledge (p = .17), or stress management (p = .27). However, at 6 months there were significant differences between Latino parents' health responsibility (p < .02) and physical activity (p < .007) than those of African American and White parents. At 6 months, the Latino, African American, and White children also showed no significant differences in body mass index (p = .08), body fat percentage (p = .71), or pedometer steps (p = .09). Our data suggest that the weight management intervention with simple, culturally sensitive nutrition and exercise messages delivered in the community benefited Latino, African American, and White parents and children. However, Latino parents did report significantly more improvements in health responsibility and physical activity. © 2009 Springer Publishing Company.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Berry, D; Turner, M; Biederman, D; Flanagan, O

Published Date

  • December 1, 2009

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 7 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 203 - 212

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1540-4153

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1891/1540-4153.7.4.203

Citation Source

  • Scopus