Longitudinal studies of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in pregnant women living in a rural Cameroonian village with high perennial transmission.

Published

Journal Article

A prospective longitudinal study of Plasmodium falciparum in pregnant women was conducted in the rural village of Ngali II, where malaria is hyperendemic and individuals receive ~0.7 infectious mosquito bites/person/day throughout the year. Pregnant women (N = 60; 19 primigravidae, 41 multigravidae) were enrolled early in pregnancy (median 14 wk) and were followed monthly, with 38 women followed through term (5.7 ± 1.1 prenatal visits and delivery). The total number of times primigravidae were slide-positive during pregnancy was higher than multigravidae (3.3 ± 1.1 versus 1.3 ± 1.3 times; P < 0.001), but no difference in the number of polymerase chain reaction-positive cases (4.6 ± 1.7 and 3.4 ± 1.7 times, P = 0.106) or total genotypes they harbored (8.9 ± 3.2 and 7.0 ± 2.9) was found. Only 7.9% women developed symptomatic infections. All primigravidae and 38% multigravidae were placental malaria-positive at delivery (P = 0.009). Genotyping showed that 77% of placental parasites were acquired ≥ 30 wks in pregnancy. These results help identify the extent of malaria-associated changes women experience during pregnancy.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Leke, RFG; Bioga, JD; Zhou, J; Fouda, GG; Leke, RJI; Tchinda, V; Megnekou, R; Fogako, J; Sama, G; Gwanmesia, P; Bomback, G; Nama, C; Diouf, A; Bobbili, N; Taylor, DW

Published Date

  • November 2010

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 83 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 996 - 1004

PubMed ID

  • 21036826

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21036826

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1476-1645

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.4269/ajtmh.2010.10-0249

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States