Concurrent administration of coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol improves learning in aged mice.

Published

Journal Article

The main purpose of this study was to determine whether supplemental intake of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) (ubiquinone-10) or alpha-tocopherol, either alone or together, could improve brain function of aged mice, as reflected in their cognitive or psychomotor performance. Separate groups of aged mice (24 months) were administered either CoQ (123 mg/kg/day), or alpha-tocopherol acetate (200 mg/kg/day), or both, or the vehicle (soybean oil) via gavage for a period of 14 weeks. Three weeks following the initiation of these treatments, mice were given a battery of age-sensitive behavioral tests for the assessment of learning, recent memory, and psychomotor function. In a test that required the mice to rapidly identify and remember the correct arm of a T-maze, and to respond preemptively in order to avoid an electric shock, the intake of alpha-tocopherol plus CoQ resulted in more rapid learning compared to the control group. Learning was not significantly improved in the mice receiving CoQ or alpha-tocopherol alone. None of the treatments resulted in a significant improvement of psychomotor performance in the old mice. In a separate study, treatment with higher doses of CoQ alone (250 or 500 mg/kg/day) for 14 weeks failed to produce effects comparable to those of the combination of alpha-tocopherol and CoQ. The apparent interaction of CoQ and alpha-tocopherol treatments is consistent with the previous suggestion, based on biochemical studies, that coenzyme Q and alpha-tocopherol act in concert. Overall, the findings suggest that concurrent supplementation of alpha-tocopherol with CoQ is more likely to be effective as a potential treatment for age-related learning deficits than supplementation with CoQ or alpha-tocopherol alone.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • McDonald, SR; Sohal, RS; Forster, MJ

Published Date

  • March 15, 2005

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 38 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 729 - 736

PubMed ID

  • 15721983

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15721983

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0891-5849

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2004.11.014

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States