Dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors during adolescence: associations with 10-year changes in body mass index.

Published

Journal Article

Dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors are common among adolescents and questions exist regarding their long-term effect on weight status.To examine 10-year longitudinal associations between dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors and changes in body mass index (BMI) from adolescence to young adulthood.A diverse population-based sample of middle school and high school adolescents participating in Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults) was followed up for 10 years. Participants (N = 1,902) completed surveys in 1998-1999 (Project EAT-I), 2003-2004 (Project EAT-II), and 2008-2009 (Project EAT-III). Dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors at Time 1 and Time 2 were used to predict 10-year changes in BMI at Time 3, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and Time 1 BMI.Dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors at both Time 1 and Time 2 predicted greater BMI increases at Time 3 in males and females, as compared with no use of these behaviors. For example, females using unhealthy weight control behaviors at both Time 1 and Time 2 increased their BMI by 4.63 units as compared with 2.29 units in females not using these behaviors (p < .001). Associations were found in both overweight and nonoverweight respondents. Specific weight control behaviors at Time 1 that predicted larger BMI increases at Time 3 included skipping meals and reporting eating very little (females and males), use of food substitutes (males), and use of diet pills (females).Findings clearly indicate that dieting and unhealthy weight control behaviors, as reported by adolescents, predict significant weight gain over time.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Neumark-Sztainer, D; Wall, M; Story, M; Standish, AR

Published Date

  • January 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 50 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 80 - 86

PubMed ID

  • 22188838

Pubmed Central ID

  • 22188838

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-1972

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1054-139X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.05.010

Language

  • eng