Participation in weight-related sports is associated with higher use of unhealthful weight-control behaviors and steroid use.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adolescents who participate in a weight-related sport are at increased risk for unhealthful weight-control behaviors and steroid use. DESIGN: This was a population-based study (Project EAT [Eating Among Teens]). SUBJECTS/SETTING: Subjects were 4,746 adolescents (50.2% males, 49.8% females) from 31 public middle and high schools in the Minneapolis/St Paul area of Minnesota. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED: Descriptive statistics, chi2 analyses, and multiple logistic regression were used. Data were adjusted for sociodemographic variables and body mass index. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLES: Unhealthful weight-control behaviors and steroid use. RESULTS: More males (20.4%) than females (16.2%) reported participation in a weight-related sport. Males who reported participation in a weight-related sport had an increased risk of past-week vomiting (odds ratio [OR]=5.7), laxative use (OR=6.8), as well as past-year vomiting (OR=4.9), laxative use (OR=3.4), diuretic use (OR=6.0), and steroid use (OR=3.7), compared with those males who did not report participation. Females who reported participation in a weight-related sport had an increased risk of past week vomiting (OR=2.1), as well as past year vomiting (OR=2.0), laxative use (OR=2.6), and steroid use (OR=2.6), compared with those who did not report participation in a weight-related sport. CONCLUSIONS: The current study shows that participation in a sport that adolescents perceive as emphasizing weight is strongly associated with unhealthful weight-control behaviors and steroid use. Preventive efforts, targeting parents, coaches, and adolescents are needed to decrease this risk.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Vertalino, M; Eisenberg, ME; Story, M; Neumark-Sztainer, D

Published Date

  • March 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 107 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 434 - 440

PubMed ID

  • 17324662

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17324662

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-8223

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jada.2006.12.010

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States