Genetic variants in p53-related genes confer susceptibility to second primary malignancy in patients with index squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck.

Published

Journal Article

Because of their important roles in mediating the stabilization and expression of p53, we hypothesized that high-risk genotypes of polymorphisms in p53-related genes, including p53, p73, p14(ARF), MDM2 and MDM4, may be associated with an increased risk of second primary malignancy (SPM) after index squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We analyzed data from a cohort of 1283 patients with index SCCHN who were recruited between 1995 and 2007 at MD Anderson Cancer Center and followed for SPM development. Patients were genotyped for nine polymorphisms of p53-related genes. A log-rank test and Cox models were used to compare SPM-free survival and risk. Our results demonstrated that each p53-related polymorphism had a moderate effect on increased SPM risk, but when we combined risk genotypes of these nine polymorphisms together, we found that SPM-free survival was significantly shorter among risk groups with a greater number of combined risk genotypes. SPM risk increased with increasing number of risk genotypes (P < 0.0001 for trend). Compared with the low-risk group (0-3 combined risk genotypes), both the medium-risk (4-5 combined risk genotypes) and high-risk (6-9 combined risk genotypes) groups had significantly increased SPM risk [hazard ratio (HR): 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0-2.6 and HR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8-5.0, respectively]. Moreover, such significant associations were even higher in several subgroups. Our findings suggest that combined risk genotypes of p53-related genes may jointly modify SPM risk, especially in patients who are smokers and those with index non-oropharyngeal cancers. However, larger studies are needed to validate our findings.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jin, L; Sturgis, EM; Zhang, Y; Huang, Z; Wei, P; Guo, W; Wang, Z; Wei, Q; Song, X; Li, G

Published Date

  • July 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 34 / 7

Start / End Page

  • 1551 - 1557

PubMed ID

  • 23508638

Pubmed Central ID

  • 23508638

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1460-2180

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0143-3334

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/carcin/bgt096

Language

  • eng