Use and Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Lobectomy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Data Base.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have raised concerns that video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy may compromise nodal evaluation. The advantages or limitations of robotic lobectomy have not been thoroughly evaluated. METHODS: Perioperative outcomes and survival of patients who underwent open versus minimally-invasive surgery (MIS [VATS and robotic]) lobectomy and VATS versus robotic lobectomy for clinical T1-2, N0 non-small cell lung cancer from 2010 to 2012 in the National Cancer Data Base were evaluated using propensity score matching. RESULTS: Of 30,040 lobectomies, 7,824 were VATS and 2,025 were robotic. After propensity score matching, when compared with the open approach (n = 9,390), MIS (n = 9,390) was found to have increased 30-day readmission rates (5% versus 4%, p < 0.01), shorter median hospital length of stay (5 versus 6 days, p < 0.01), and improved 2-year survival (87% versus 86%, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in nodal upstaging and 30-day mortality between the two groups. After propensity score matching, when compared with the robotic group (n = 1,938), VATS (n = 1,938) was not significantly different from robotics with regard to nodal upstaging, 30-day mortality, and 2-year survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based analysis, MIS (VATS and robotic) lobectomy was used in the minority of patients for stage I non-small cell lung cancer. MIS lobectomy was associated with shorter length of hospital stay and was not associated with increased perioperative mortality, compromised nodal evaluation, or reduced short-term survival when compared with the open approach. These results suggest the need for broader implementation of MIS techniques.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Yang, C-FJ; Sun, Z; Speicher, PJ; Saud, SM; Gulack, BC; Hartwig, MG; Harpole, DH; Onaitis, MW; Tong, BC; D'Amico, TA; Berry, MF

Published Date

  • March 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 101 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 1037 - 1042

PubMed ID

  • 26822346

Pubmed Central ID

  • 26822346

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1552-6259

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.11.018

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Netherlands