Effects of Mindful Acceptance and Reappraisal Training on Maladaptive Beliefs About Rumination

Published

Journal Article

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The present study examined the relative effects of mindful acceptance and reappraisal on metacognitive attitudes and beliefs in relation to rumination and negative experiences. A small but growing literature has compared the effects of these strategies on immediate emotional experience, but little work has examined the broader, metacognitive impact of these strategies, such as maladaptive beliefs about rumination. One hundred and twenty-nine participants who reported elevated symptoms of depression were randomly assigned to receive brief training in mindful acceptance, reappraisal, or no training prior to undergoing an autobiographical sad mood induction. Participants rated their beliefs in relation to rumination and negative experiences before and after instructions to engage in mood regulation. Results showed that relative to reappraisal or no training, training in mindful acceptance resulted in greater decreases in maladaptive beliefs about rumination. The study suggests that training in mindful acceptance promotes beneficial changes in metacognitive attitudes and beliefs relevant to depression, and contributes to a greater understanding of the mechanisms through which mindfulness-based interventions lead to positive outcomes.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Keng, SL; Smoski, MJ; Robins, CJ

Published Date

  • April 1, 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 7 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 493 - 503

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1868-8535

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1868-8527

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s12671-015-0480-x

Citation Source

  • Scopus