Long-term follow-up of amitriptyline treatment for idiopathic cough.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate short- and long-term treatment outcomes of amitriptyline for idiopathic cough. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective chart review and anonymous survey of a patient cohort. METHODS: We evaluated a cohort of adults treated for cough at the Duke Voice Care Center with amitriptyline over a 2- to 3-year period. We characterized demographics, symptoms, treatment variability, and treatment effects from chart review and survey responses. We performed univariate analysis comparing cough improvement to age, gender, symptoms of throat irritation, cough duration, concurrent speech therapy, and dosage. RESULTS: Eighty-nine percent were taking the medication at the first clinical follow-up at a mean 2.6 months, and overall, 67% reported ≥50% improvement. No statistically significant predictors of cough improvement with medication were identified. At follow-up 2 to 3 years later, overall, 53% reported ≥50% improvement, with only 34% of patients still taking amitriptyline. After 2 to 3 years, 65% of patients had titrated the medication to effect, and 33% restarted the medication. Occurrence of side effects was the most frequent reason for stopping the medication. CONCLUSIONS: Amitriptyline can be an effective and well-tolerated part of short- and long-term management of idiopathic cough in adults. Titrating the dose and restarting are often necessary. Larger studies and randomized control trials are needed to better understand the outcomes of using amitriptyline to treat idiopathic cough. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2758-2763, 2016.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Ryan, MA; Cohen, SM

Published Date

  • December 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 126 / 12

Start / End Page

  • 2758 - 2763

PubMed ID

  • 27223493

Pubmed Central ID

  • 27223493

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1531-4995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/lary.25978

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States