Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

Published

Journal Article

Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (p< 0.05). The 8mm single bore technique removed a significantly larger volume of bone compared to the 3mm multiple drilling technique (p< 0.001). However, total fracture energy was similar between the two core decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Brown, PJ; Mannava, S; Seyler, TM; Plate, JF; Van Sikes, C; Stitzel, JD; Lang, JE

Published Date

  • October 26, 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 29 /

Start / End Page

  • 247 - 254

PubMed ID

  • 27466872

Pubmed Central ID

  • 27466872

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1090-3941

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States