Can public information programs affect risk perceptions?

Published

Journal Article

This article provides the first controlled evaluation of how different information materials explaining the risks from radon influenced people's perceptions of these risks. Using a panel study, it was possible to observe how stated risk perceptions responded to information about indoor radon concentrations and brochures explaining the radon readings. The findings indicate that risk communication policies can be effective in modifying risk perceptions. Moreover, they have three specific implications for radon policy: (1) Public officials should not adopt strategies that provide minimal risk information to the public as a means of avoiding undue alarm, for this can have the reverse effect; (2) measures of the effectiveness of risk communication will depend on how education and behavior change are defined; (3) categorical guidelines about risk without quantitative information can lead people to treat the levels as thresholds, creating an artificial discontinuity in their responses to small changes in risk perceptions. Copyright © 1990 Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Smith, VK; Desvousges, WH; Johnson, FR; Fisher, A

Published Date

  • January 1, 1990

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 9 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 41 - 59

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1520-6688

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0276-8739

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.2307/3325112

Citation Source

  • Scopus