Pubic Bone Resection Provides Objective Pain Control in the Prostate Cancer Survivor With Pubic Bone Osteomyelitis With an Associated Urinary Tract to Pubic Symphysis Fistula.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: To investigate pain intensity perception in prostate cancer survivors with pubic bone osteomyelitis with an associated urinary tract to pubic symphysis fistula before and after definitive surgical management. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a review of an institutional review board-approved database of prostate cancer survivors with pubic bone osteomyelitis from 2010 to 2015. Demographic and clinical data were extracted. Pain scores were assessed in patients at varying points before and after definitive treatment using an 11-point numeric rating scale. Statistical analysis was performed using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test and NcNemar's test. RESULTS: We identified 16 patients with a median age of 72 who met inclusion criteria. Chronic narcotic use for pain management was noted in 6 of 16 (37.5%) patients preoperatively. No statistical difference was identified between the pain score at the time of diagnosis and after completion of conservative measures (5.5 vs 5.5, P = .76). A statistically significant decrease in median pain score at the first follow-up appointment was seen compared to the preoperative pain score (0 vs. 5.5, P = .0005). At a median follow-up of 9.4 months (interquartile range 3.7-16.5), a sustained decrease in the median pain intensity score was noted in our cohort compared to their preoperative baseline pain score (5.5 vs 0, P = .0005) and pain score at the time of diagnosis (5.5 vs 0, P = .004.) CONCLUSION: Pubic bone resection provides immediate and sustained improvement in pain intensity perception in the prostate cancer survivor with pubic bone osteomyelitis with an associated urinary tract to pubic symphysis fistula.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lavien, G; Chery, G; Zaid, UB; Peterson, AC

Published Date

  • February 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 100 /

Start / End Page

  • 234 - 239

PubMed ID

  • 27591809

Pubmed Central ID

  • 27591809

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1527-9995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.urology.2016.08.035

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States