The association of aspirin use with age-related macular degeneration

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Objective: To determine whether regular aspirin use is associated with a higher risk for developing agerelated macular degeneration (AMD) by using analyzed data from a 15-year prospective cohort. Methods: A prospective analysis was conducted of data from an Australian population-based cohort with 4 examinations during a 15-year period (1992-1994 to 2007-2009). Participants completed a detailed questionnaire at baseline assessing aspirin use, cardiovascular disease status, and AMD risk factors. Age-related macular degeneration was graded side-by-side from retinal photographs taken at each study visit to assess the incidence of neovascular (wet) AMD and geographic atrophy (dry AMD) according to the international AMD classification. Results: Of 2389 baseline participants with follow-up data available, 257 individuals (10.8%) were regular aspirin users and 63 of the 2389 developed neovascular AMD. Persons who were regular aspirin users were more likely to have incident neovascular AMD: the 15-year cumulative incidence was 9.3% in users and 3.7% in nonusers. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index, persons who were regular aspirin users had a higher risk of developing neovascular AMD (odds ratio [OR], 2.46; 95% CI, 1.25-4.83). The association showed a dose-response effect (multivariate-adjusted P=.01 for trend). Aspirin use was not associated with the incidence of geographic atrophy (multivariate-adjusted OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.59-1.65). Conclusion: Regular aspirin use is associated with increased risk of incident neovascular AMD, independent of a history of cardiovascular disease and smoking. © 2013 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Liew, G; Mitchell, P; Wong, TY; Rochtchina, E; Wang, JJ

Published Date

  • February 25, 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 173 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 258 - 264

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2168-6106

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.1583

Citation Source

  • Scopus