Characteristics of patients treated for orbital cellulitis: An analysis of inpatient data.

Journal Article

Orbital cellulitis represents a spectrum of diseases, some of which may progress to potentially serious complications. The authors used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database to analyze the epidemiologic features of pediatric and adult patients admitted for the treatment of orbital cellulitis and to examine associations with surgical management.The NIS was queried for patients admitted for treatment of orbital cellulitis from 2002 to 2010. Patient demographics, length of stay, hospital charges, and concomitant diagnoses were analyzed.There were 14,149 cases of orbital cellulitis identified with 1,717 (12.1%) having undergone surgical management. Surgical patients were older (29.6 ± 23.4) and more commonly male (62.0%) (P = 0.004 and < 0.001, respectively). Patients who had surgical intervention had longer length of stay and higher hospital charges than nonsurgical patients (P < 0.001). Our study showed that the proportion of pediatric patients age 10 to 19 years (22.1%) undergoing surgery was four times that of patients < 5 years of age (5.1%) (P < 0.001). Patients with concomitant diagnoses of acute and chronic sinusitis, acute osteomyelitis, exophthalmos, diplopia, and conjunctival edema had significantly increased odds ratio of surgical intervention. Frontal sinusitis was the site most commonly associated with surgical intervention among sinusitis patients.This study describes the characteristics of pediatric and adult patients admitted for orbital cellulitis from a national perspective. Patients 10 to 19 years of age were most likely to undergo surgical management. Acute and chronic sinusitis, acute osteomyelitis, exophthalmos, diplopia, and conjunctival edema were concomitant diagnoses associated with significantly increased odds ratio of surgical intervention.2C. Laryngoscope, 126:554-559, 2016.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Marchiano, E; Raikundalia, MD; Carniol, ET; Echanique, KA; Kalyoussef, E; Baredes, S; Eloy, JA

Published Date

  • March 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 126 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 554 - 559

PubMed ID

  • 26307941

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1531-4995

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0023-852X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/lary.25529

Language

  • eng