Muscle protein changes following eccentric exercise in humans.

Published

Journal Article

This study characterized changes in the protein composition of human muscle tissue after eccentric exercise. Four subjects performed 70 maximum eccentric, isokinetic actions of the forearm flexors with one arm. The other arm served as control. A biopsy of the biceps muscle of each arm was taken 2 days after exercise when muscles were very sore (mean = 8.0; 1 = normal; 10 = very, very sore), and muscle damage was documented by a mean decrease of 0.2 radians in the relaxed elbow angle. Proteins from the biopsy tissue were solubilized in a high ionic strength buffer containing several proteolytic inhibitors. Protein concentrations of the extracts were determined and identical amounts loaded onto sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels (7.5, 12.5, and 17.5%). Densitometric analysis of the Coomassie brilliant blue stained gels revealed alterations in the amounts of three protein bands in the exercised tissue relative to the control. These changes were in the linear portion of the graph of absorbance versus protein amount. Wilcoxon's signed rank test showed the first two of the following bands to increase significantly in amount (P less than 0.062). The average percentage changes [mean (SEM)] for these bands were 63 (21), 39 (5), and 82 (35). The corresponding molecular weights determined from known standards were 76300 (860), 33200 (310), and 12000 (80) daltons, respectively. These changes imply that the increased synthesis, decreased degradation, or some combination thereof, of these three proteins may be necessary for the repair or regeneration response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Reichsman, F; Scordilis, SP; Clarkson, PM; Evans, WJ

Published Date

  • 1991

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 62 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 245 - 250

PubMed ID

  • 2044533

Pubmed Central ID

  • 2044533

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0301-5548

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/bf00571547

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Germany