Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

Poststroke depression (PSD) is common, affecting approximately one third of stroke survivors at any one time after stroke. Individuals with PSD are at a higher risk for suboptimal recovery, recurrent vascular events, poor quality of life, and mortality. Although PSD is prevalent, uncertainty remains regarding predisposing risk factors and optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on the topic of PSD. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. Members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise and reviewed appropriate literature, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, and expert opinion. This multispecialty statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence and gaps in current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, management, and prevention of PSD, and provides implications for clinical practice.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Towfighi, A; Ovbiagele, B; El Husseini, N; Hackett, ML; Jorge, RE; Kissela, BM; Mitchell, PH; Skolarus, LE; Whooley, MA; Williams, LS; American Heart Association Stroke Council; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research,

Published Date

  • February 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 48 / 2

Start / End Page

  • e30 - e43

PubMed ID

  • 27932603

Pubmed Central ID

  • 27932603

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1524-4628

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1161/STR.0000000000000113

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States