Poaching empties critical Central African wilderness of forest elephants.

Published

Journal Article (Letter)

Elephant populations are in peril everywhere, but forest elephants in Central Africa have sustained alarming losses in the last decade [1]. Large, remote protected areas are thought to best safeguard forest elephants by supporting large populations buffered from habitat fragmentation, edge effects and human pressures. One such area, the Minkébé National Park (MNP), Gabon, was created chiefly for its reputation of harboring a large elephant population. MNP held the highest densities of elephants in Central Africa at the turn of the century, and was considered a critical sanctuary for forest elephants because of its relatively large size and isolation. We assessed population change in the park and its surroundings between 2004 and 2014. Using two independent modeling approaches, we estimated a 78-81% decline in elephant numbers over ten years - a loss of more than 25,000 elephants. While poaching occurs from within Gabon, cross-border poaching largely drove the precipitous drop in elephant numbers. With nearly 50% of forest elephants in Central Africa thought to reside in Gabon [1], their loss from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Poulsen, JR; Koerner, SE; Moore, S; Medjibe, VP; Blake, S; Clark, CJ; Akou, ME; Fay, M; Meier, A; Okouyi, J; Rosin, C; White, LJT

Published Date

  • February 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 27 / 4

Start / End Page

  • R134 - R135

PubMed ID

  • 28222286

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28222286

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-0445

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0960-9822

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.cub.2017.01.023

Language

  • eng