A comparison of fear-avoidance beliefs in patients with lumbar spine pain and cervical spine pain.

Published

Journal Article

STUDY DESIGN: A prospective consecutive cohort study of patients with cervical spine pain and patients with lumbar spine pain referred to an academic medical center. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the presence of fear-avoidance beliefs in a sample of patients with cervical spine pain and to compare the association of pain intensity, disability, and fear-avoidance beliefs in patients with cervical spine pain with that in patients with lumbar spine pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Fear-avoidance beliefs are a specific psychosocial variable involved in the development of disability from low back pain. Psychosocial variables are believed to play a role in cervical disability, but specific variables have not been investigated. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to a multidisciplinary center completed self-reports of disability, pain intensity, and fear-avoidance beliefs during an initial evaluation session. Gender, type of symptom onset, acuity, and payer source were also recorded. Associations between disability, pain intensity, and fear-avoidance beliefs were investigated in patients with cervical spine pain and patients with lumbar spine pain. RESULTS: In all, 163 patients completed the self-reports and were included in this study. Weaker relations between fear-avoidance beliefs and disability were found in patients with cervical pain than in those with lumbar pain. Significant differences in fear-avoidance beliefs were found for gender, type of symptom onset, and payer source (workers' compensation, auto insurance, and traditional insurance). CONCLUSION: The associations among fear-avoidance beliefs, pain intensity, and disability differed between patients with cervical spine pain and patients with lumbar spine pain. Fear-avoidance beliefs were significantly different in subgroups of patients.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • George, SZ; Fritz, JM; Erhard, RE

Published Date

  • October 1, 2001

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 26 / 19

Start / End Page

  • 2139 - 2145

PubMed ID

  • 11698893

Pubmed Central ID

  • 11698893

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0362-2436

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States