Recent advances in understanding Epstein-Barr virus.

Published online

Journal Article (Review)

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common human herpes virus known to infect the majority of the world population. Infection with EBV is often asymptomatic but can manifest in a range of pathologies from infectious mononucleosis to severe cancers of epithelial and lymphocytic origin. Indeed, in the past decade, EBV has been linked to nearly 10% of all gastric cancers. Furthermore, recent advances in high-throughput next-generation sequencing and the development of humanized mice, which effectively model EBV pathogenesis, have led to a wealth of knowledge pertaining to strain variation and host-pathogen interaction. This review highlights some recent advances in our understanding of EBV biology, focusing on new findings on the early events of infection, the role EBV plays in gastric cancer, new strain variation, and humanized mouse models of EBV infection.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Stanfield, BA; Luftig, MA

Published Date

  • 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 6 /

Start / End Page

  • 386 -

PubMed ID

  • 28408983

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28408983

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2046-1402

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.12688/f1000research.10591.1

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England