Factors Associated With Success of Clinician-Researchers Receiving Career Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

Published

Journal Article

PURPOSE:Understanding the careers of recent career development awardees is essential to guide interventions to ensure gender equity and success in academic medicine. METHOD:In 2010-2011 (T1) and 2014 (T2), 1,719 clinician-researchers who received new K08 and K23 awards in 2006-2009 were longitudinally surveyed. Multivariable analyses evaluated the influence of factors on success, including demographics, job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. RESULTS:Of 1,275 respondents at T1, 1,066 (493 women; 573 men) responded at T2. Men and women differed in job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. By T2, women had less funding (mean $780,000 vs. $1,120,000, P = .002) and published fewer papers (mean 33 vs. 45). Using a composite measure that considered funding, publications, or leadership to define success, 53.5% (264/493) of women and 67.0% (384/573) of men were successful. Gender differences in success persisted after accounting for other significant predictors-K award type, specialty, award year, work hours, funding institute tier, feeling responsible for participating in department/division administration, importance of publishing prolifically, feeling responsible for contributing to clinical care, importance of publishing high-quality research, collegiality of the mentoring relationship, adequacy of research equipment, and departmental climate. A significant interaction existed between K award type and gender; the gender difference in success was most pronounced among K23 researchers (among whom the odds ratio for females = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS:Men and women continue to have different experiences and career outcomes, with important implications for the design of interventions to promote equity and success.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jagsi, R; Griffith, KA; Jones, RD; Stewart, A; Ubel, PA

Published Date

  • October 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 92 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 1429 - 1439

PubMed ID

  • 28537950

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28537950

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1938-808X

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1040-2446

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001728

Language

  • eng