Ability to return to work without restrictions in workers compensation patients undergoing hip arthroscopy.

Published online

Journal Article

The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of worker's compensation (WC) patients to return to work without restrictions after hip arthroscopy. Twenty-nine WC patients along with age and gender matched controls who underwent hip arthroscopy were retrospectively reviewed after achieving maximum medical improvement (MMI) status at minimum 1 year postoperatively. Patient demographic factors were evaluated, along with the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living and Sports-Specific subscales, and the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). The majority of WC patients were able to return to work without restrictions after reaching MMI (20/29, 69.0%). WC patients who failed to return to work without restrictions had a prolonged time from injury to surgery (3.01 ± 2.16 months versus 6.36 ± 4.16 months; P = 0.0079), more concomitant orthopedic injuries (4/20, 20.0% versus 9/9, 100%; P = 0.0001), and higher body mass index (BMI) (26.61 ± 3.52 versus 29.54 ± 3.43; P = 0.047) than those who returned to work without restrictions. WC patients had significant improvement of patient-reported outcome scores following hip arthroscopy (P < 0.0001), but WC patients who returned to work without restrictions had higher scores than those who failed to do so (HOD-ADL: P < 0.0001; HOS-SS: P = 0.004; mHHS: P = 0.009). The majority of WC patients are able to return to work without restrictions when they reach MMI status following hip arthroscopy. Factors associated with failure to return to work without restrictions include prolonged time course between injury and surgical treatment, concomitant orthopaedic injuries, and a higher BMI. Level III, retrospective case-control study.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lee, S; Cvetanovich, GL; Mascarenhas, R; Wuerz, TH; Mather, RC; Bush-Joseph, CA; Nho, SJ

Published Date

  • January 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 4 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 30 - 38

PubMed ID

  • 28630718

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28630718

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2054-8397

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/jhps/hnw037

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England