Safety of union home care aides in Washington State.

Published

Journal Article

INTRODUCTION: A rate-based understanding of home care aides' adverse occupational outcomes related to their work location and care tasks is lacking. METHODS: Within a 30-month, dynamic cohort of 43 394 home care aides in Washington State, injury rates were calculated by aides' demographic and work characteristics. Injury narratives and focus groups provided contextual detail. RESULTS: Injury rates were higher for home care aides categorized as female, white, 50 to <65 years old, less experienced, with a primary language of English, and working through an agency (versus individual providers). In addition to direct occupational hazards, variability in workload, income, and supervisory/social support is of concern. CONCLUSIONS: Policies should address the roles and training of home care aides, consumers, and managers/supervisors. Home care aides' improved access to often-existing resources to identify, manage, and eliminate occupational hazards is called for to prevent injuries and address concerns related to the vulnerability of this needed workforce.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Schoenfisch, AL; Lipscomb, H; Phillips, LE

Published Date

  • September 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 60 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 798 - 810

PubMed ID

  • 28744929

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28744929

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-0274

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/ajim.22747

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States