Developmental sequelae and neurophysiologic substrates of sensory seeking in infant siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder.

Published

Journal Article

It has been proposed that early differences in sensory responsiveness arise from atypical neural function and produce cascading effects on development across domains. This longitudinal study prospectively followed infants at heightened risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) based on their status as younger siblings of children diagnosed with ASD (Sibs-ASD) and infants at relatively lower risk for ASD (siblings of typically developing children; Sibs-TD) to examine the developmental sequelae and possible neurophysiological substrates of a specific sensory response pattern: unusually intense interest in nonsocial sensory stimuli or "sensory seeking." At 18 months, sensory seeking and social orienting were measured with the Sensory Processing Assessment, and a potential neural signature for sensory seeking (i.e., frontal alpha asymmetry) was measured via resting state electroencephalography. At 36 months, infants' social symptomatology was assessed in a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation. Sibs-ASD showed elevated sensory seeking relative to Sibs-TD, and increased sensory seeking was concurrently associated with reduced social orienting across groups and resting frontal asymmetry in Sibs-ASD. Sensory seeking also predicted later social symptomatology. Findings suggest that sensory seeking may produce cascading effects on social development in infants at risk for ASD and that atypical frontal asymmetry may underlie this atypical pattern of sensory responsiveness.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Damiano-Goodwin, CR; Woynaroski, TG; Simon, DM; Ibañez, LV; Murias, M; Kirby, A; Newsom, CR; Wallace, MT; Stone, WL; Cascio, CJ

Published Date

  • January 2018

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 29 /

Start / End Page

  • 41 - 53

PubMed ID

  • 28889988

Pubmed Central ID

  • 28889988

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1878-9307

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1878-9293

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.dcn.2017.08.005

Language

  • eng