Prevalence of Surgically Untreated Face, Head, and Neck Conditions in Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Nationwide Household Survey.

Published

Journal Article

The Surgeons OverSeas Assessment of Surgical Need tool (SOSAS) was created to evaluate the burden of surgically treatable conditions in low- and middle-income countries. The goal of our study is to describe the face, head, and neck (FHN) conditions that need surgical care in Uganda, along with barriers to that care and disability from these conditions.A 2-stage cluster randomized SOSAS survey was administered in a cross-sectional manner between August and September 2014. Participants included randomly selected persons in 105 enumeration areas in 74 districts throughout Uganda with 24 households in each cluster. The SOSAS survey collected demographic and clinical data on all respondents. Univariate and multivariate logistic models evaluated associations of demographic characteristics and clinical characteristics of the FHN conditions and outcomes of whether health care was sought or surgical care was received.Of the 4428 respondents, 331 (7.8%) reported having FHN conditions. The most common types of conditions were injury-related wounds. Of those who reported an FHN condition, 36% reported receiving no surgical care whereas 82.5% reported seeking health care. In the multivariate model, literacy and type of condition were significant predictors of seeking health care whereas village type, literacy, and type of condition remained significant predictors of receiving surgical care.Many individuals in Uganda are not receiving surgical care and barriers include costs, rural residency, and literacy. Our study highlights the need for targeted interventions in various parts of Uganda to increase human resources for surgery and expand surgical capacity.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Fuller, AT; Corley, J; Tran, TM; Butler, EK; Vissoci, JR; Andrade, L; Makumbi, F; Luboga, S; Muhumuza, C; Ssennono, VF; Chipman, JG; Galukande, M; Haglund, MM; Smith, ER

Published Date

  • February 2018

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 110 /

Start / End Page

  • e747 - e754

PubMed ID

  • 29180091

Pubmed Central ID

  • 29180091

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1878-8769

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1878-8750

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.11.099

Language

  • eng