A decade in diabetes specialist services, 2000 to 2011, in England: the views of consultant diabetologists and diabetes specialist nurses amidst persistent healthcare delivery change.

Published

Journal Article

To assess the impact of continual major National Health Service reorganization on commissioning, organizational and delivery arrangements for secondary care diabetes services. To explore how consultant diabetologists and diabetes specialist nurses perceive the issues facing diabetes specialist services in 2011 and how these have changed in the preceding decade.We used a longitudinal case study approach that combined quantitative and qualitative methods. Five locations in England were purposively selected to represent the wider diabetes specialist community, and seven semi-structured interviews were conducted. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework analysis. Findings were compared with and contrasted to results from national quantitative surveys of diabetes specialist services undertaken in 2000 and 2006.Clinicians viewed positively the expertise and commitment of multidisciplinary teams and their ability to adapt to new situations. Negative perceptions persisted throughout the decade, relating to the continual change that threatens to dismantle relationships and services which had taken many years to establish. Lack of resources, inadequate manpower planning and poor access to psychological support for people with diabetes remained constant themes from 2000 to 2011.A willingness to innovate and work differently to improve services was identified; however, clinicians must be supported through organizational changes to ensure people with diabetes receive high-quality care. The disruptive nature of organizational change was a recurrent theme throughout the decade. Periods of stability must exist within commissioning to allow relationships, which are key to integration, to be maintained and permit service improvements to develop.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Gosden, CA; Barnard, K; Williams, DRR; Tinati, T; Turner, B; Holt, RIG

Published Date

  • December 2015

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 32 / 12

Start / End Page

  • 1662 - 1666

PubMed ID

  • 25916313

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25916313

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1464-5491

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0742-3071

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/dme.12786

Language

  • eng