Is frequency of fast food and sit-down restaurant eating occasions differentially associated with less healthful eating habits?

Published

Journal Article

© 2016 The Authors Studies have shown that frequency of fast food restaurant eating and sit-down restaurant eating is differentially associated with nutrient intakes and biometric outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine whether frequency of fast food and sit-down restaurant eating occasions was differentially associated with less healthful eating habits, independent of demographic characteristics. Data were collected from participants in 2015 enrolled in a worksite nutrition intervention trial (n = 388) in North Carolina who completed self-administered questionnaires at baseline. We used multiple logistic regressions to estimate associations between frequency of restaurant eating occasions and four less healthful eating habits, controlling for age, sex, race, education, marital status, and worksite. On average, participants in the highest tertile of fast food restaurant eating (vs. lowest tertile) had increased odds of usual intake of processed meat (OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.71, 5.28), red meat (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.33, 4.00), refined grain bread (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.23, 4.10), and sweet baked goods and candy (OR = 3.50, 95% CI = 2.00, 6.12). No associations were found between frequency of sit-down restaurant eating and less healthful eating habits. We conclude that greater frequency of fast food restaurant eating is associated with less healthful eating habits. Our findings suggest that taste preferences or other factors, independent of demographic characteristics, might explain the decision to eat at fast food or sit-down restaurants.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Close, MA; Lytle, LA; Viera, AJ

Published Date

  • December 1, 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 4 /

Start / End Page

  • 574 - 577

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2211-3355

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.10.011

Citation Source

  • Scopus