Neural correlates of amusia in williams syndrome.

Published online

Journal Article

Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia). Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lense, MD; Dankner, N; Pryweller, JR; Thornton-Wells, TA; Dykens, EM

Published Date

  • November 21, 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 4 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 594 - 612

PubMed ID

  • 25422929

Pubmed Central ID

  • 25422929

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2076-3425

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3390/brainsci4040594

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Switzerland